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Posted by on Oct 27, 2015 in Blog, Politics, What's Left | 1 comment

Fracking the Media: Do Ee Have Too Many News Choices?

 

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Fracking the Media:  Does shrinking and therefore dividing news sources sabotage our common understanding of reality and impede compromise?  Might this spell the end of democracy?

 

Today’s article is a continuation somewhat of yesterday’s topic, “Are Twitter and Facebook Flaming Out?” which can be read HERE.

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Posted by on Dec 17, 2014 in Blog, Essays, Politics, Travel, What's Left | 0 comments

Cuba Libre

 

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Today’s breaking news that the United States of America might finally normalize diplomatic relations with the island nation of Cuba comes as a long-overdue surprise and welcome stunner.

The arguments in favor of such a bold new foreign policy adjustment — based on a 21st Century vision of the world we now live in, rather than outdated Cold War sentiment drummed up back when President Eisenhower was in the White House — do seem so overwhelming, that space in this article won’t be wasted away justifying what should clearly be obvious.  Normalizing U.S.-Cuba relations is not only politically wise for the vast majority of citizens of both countries, but morally it is the right thing to do.

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Posted by on Nov 4, 2014 in Blog, Politics, What's Left | 0 comments

2014 Election: None of the Above?

 

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If “None of the Above” were the name of a political candidate, it would most likely win a majority of today’s election races.

After all, more Americans now identify themselves as independents than either Democrats or Republicans.

Yet, independents and third-party candidates almost never win elections.  They aren’t even on the political radar screen.  Out of 537 elected officials in Washington, only two are actual independents — Sen. Bernie Sanders (Vermont) and Angus King (Maine).  Everyone else in the federal system is wrapped up, bought, and paid for by the two major political parties and their powerful puppet masters.

People insist they’re angry.  Approval ratings for the House and Senate have bottomed out at all-time lows, currently at around 15 percent.  That’s about on par with used car salesmen.  Virtually no one in America, aside from party hacks and powerful interest groups which are designed to screw the working class of this nation, are satisfied with congressional leadership and gridlock.

The terrible irony here is that so many citizens of different political persuasions are disgusted with the political process and members of congress churned out by this industrialized clusterfuck of mass corruption and ineptitude.  Yet, they do nothing to bring about change, nor will they break away from self-defeating voting patterns which clearly don’t reflect their views and interests.  Something is seriously wrong in America when a majority of low and middle class people are voting for candidates backed by big banks, giant corporations, and insurance companies.

So, for those of us who are royally pissed off at the two major political parties and most of their candidates — what do we do today?  How should progressives vote?

Tough question.

Answering this question requires some painful compromises and Machiavellian pragmatism.  Consider the following:

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